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Carrying (basketball)

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Title: Carrying (basketball)  
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Subject: Basketball, Outline of basketball, Index of basketball-related articles, Five-second rule (basketball), Tip drill (basketball)
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Carrying (basketball)

Carrying, also colloquially referred to as palming, is a violation in the game of basketball. It occurs when the dribbling player continues to dribble after allowing the ball to come to rest in one or both hands. Carrying is similar to a double dribble because the player momentarily stops dribbling and then resumes dribbling. If the player is in motion while carrying the ball, then it is similar to traveling. Players can avoid a carrying violation by keeping their palms facing the floor while dribbling.

Most basketball players slide their hand to one side of the ball when dribbling to better control the ball, directing it from left to right and vice versa. So long as the ball does not come to rest this is perfectly legal. Moreover, dribbling this way allows more control and easier ball-handling. The problem arises when the ball-handler slides their hand too far down the side of the ball, having their hand below the ball. This is when the player is in violation and a carrying violation has been committed. Patrick Ewing was famous for his carries, which led to stricter monitoring league-wide in 2004


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