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Lagori

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Lagori

Lagori
A game of Dabba Kali in Kerala
Age range 4 and up
Setup time less than a minute
Playing time no limit
Random chance Low
Skill(s) required Running, Observation, Speed, Strength, Throwing
Kids playing Lagori in a Bangalore street

Lagori, dikori or lagoori (Persian: هفت‌سنگ (haft sang), meaning seven stones), also known as lingocha, widely played in South India, is a game played between two teams in an unlimited area involing a ball and a pile of flat stones. A member of one team (the seekers)[1] throws a soft ball at a pile of stones to knock them over. The seekers then try to restore the pile of stones while the opposing team (the hitters)[1] throws the ball at them. If the ball touches a seeker, he is out and his team continues without him. But a team member can always safeguard himself by touching the opposite team member before the ball hits him.

Additional rules

These additional rules make the game even more interesting.

  • Clearly mark the boundary. If any of the seekers crosses it then he is out.
  • If the person trying to knock down the pile cannot do it in three tries then he is out.
  • In any of the three tries, if the thrower's ball does not knock down the pile and is caught by an opponent after the first bounce then the thrower is out.
  • If the thrower's ball bounces off the pile and an opponent catches it then the thrower's whole team is out.
  • If the seekers succeed in restoring the pile then they can use the point scored to buy back their ousted team mate.
  • if the opponent player hit the ball on the leg of throwers and its team the all players are out.

Skills

  • Throwing the ball;
  • Evading the ball;
  • Building the pile of stones;
  • Distracting the opposite team from building the pile.

Alternative names in India

Olapanthu - ball made of coconut leaves - used to play the game in Kerala

In other parts of the country, the same game is known by the name of lingorchya (Maharashtra), pitthu (Haryana and northern Rajasthan), sitoliya (Rajasthan), or satodiyu (Gujarat). In Andhra Pradesh, logori is played with 7 stones and is called yedu penkulata, dikori or pittu. In Kerala it is known as dabba kali (and played using a ball made of coconut leaves)[2] and in Tamil Nadu as "ezhu kallu".[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "The street game of LAGORI". Sportales.com. 28 January 2007. Retrieved 29 July 2011. 
  2. ^ Cohen, Noam. "When Knowledge Isn’t Written, Does It Still Count?" The New York Times. August 7, 2011. Retrieved on September 22, 2011.
  3. ^ Seven stones (ஏழு கல்லு)

External links

  • Indian games
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