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List of U.S. state amphibians

 

List of U.S. state amphibians

This is a list of official U.S. state amphibians. State amphibians are designated by tradition or the respective state legislatures.[1]

Contents

  • Table 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Table

State State amphibian Binomial
nomenclature
Photo Year
Alabama Red Hills salamander Phaeognathus hubrichti 2000[2]
Arizona Arizona tree frog Hyla eximia 1986[3]
California California red-legged frog "Rana draytonii" 2014[4]
Colorado Western tiger salamander Ambystoma mavortium 2012[5]
Georgia American green tree frog Hyla cinerea 2005[6]
Illinois Eastern tiger salamander Ambystoma tigrinum 2005[7]
Iowa North American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana Unofficial
Kansas Barred tiger salamander Ambystoma mavortium 2005[8]
Louisiana American green tree frog Hyla cinerea 1993[9]
Minnesota Northern leopard frog Rana pipiens Proposed in 1999[10]
Missouri North American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana 2005[11]
New Hampshire Red-spotted newt Notophthalmus viridescens 1985[12]
New Mexico New Mexico spadefoot toad Spea multiplicata 2003[13]
New York Wood frog Rana sylvatica Proposed in 2015[14]
Ohio Spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum 2010[15]
Oklahoma North American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana 1997[16]
South Carolina Spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum 1999[17]
Tennessee Tennessee cave salamander Gyrinophilus palleucus 1995[18]
Texas Texas toad Bufo speciosus 2009[19]
Vermont Northern leopard frog Rana pipiens 1998[20]
Washington Pacific tree frog Pseudacris regilla 2007[21]
D.C. & U.S. Territories Amphibian Binomial
nomenclature
Image Year
Puerto Rico Common coquí Eleutherodactylus coqui Unofficial


See also

References

  1. ^ Official State Amphibians NetState.com, accessed April 21, 2006.
  2. ^ "Official Alabama State Amphibian". Alabama Emblems, Symbols and Honors. Alabama Department of Archives & History. 2003-11-06. Retrieved 2007-03-18. 
  3. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  4. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2015-01-01. 
  5. ^ "Colorado State Amphibian". Colorado. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  6. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  7. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  8. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  9. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  10. ^ "Minnesota State Symbols--Unofficial, Proposed, or Facetious". Minnesota Legislative Reference Library. Minnesota Legislative Reference Library. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  11. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  12. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  13. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  14. ^ Mahoney, Bill (17 June 2015). "Senate backs the wood frog — barely". Capital New York. Retrieved 18 June 2015. 
  15. ^ "State Amphibian - Spotted Salamander". Profile Ohio. Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  16. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  17. ^ State of South Carolina Code of Laws. "Title 1, Chapter 1, Article 9, Section 1-1-699". Retrieved 2007-07-15. 
  18. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  19. ^ "Students Lauded for Naming Official State Amphibian of Texas" (Press release). Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. 2009-12-04. Retrieved 2010-04-26. 
  20. ^ "Official State Amphibians". State Symbols. NETSTATE. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  21. ^ State Symbols of Washington. "State symbols". Archived from the original on 2007-11-15. Retrieved 2007-11-27. 

External links

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