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Three seconds rule

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Title: Three seconds rule  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Outline of basketball, Basketball, Key (basketball), Index of basketball-related articles, Rules of basketball
Collection: 1936 Introductions, Rules of Basketball
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Three seconds rule

The three seconds rule (also referred to as the three-second rule or three in the key, with a breach often termed a lane violation) requires that in basketball, a player shall not remain in the opponents' restricted area for more than three consecutive seconds while his team is in control of a live ball in the frontcourt and the game clock is running.[1]

The three-second rule was introduced in 1936 and was then expressed: no offensive player could remain in the free throw lane, with or without the ball, for more than three seconds.

The three-second rule came about in part following a game at Irving Terjesen and Irwin Klein combined to guard one of UK's major players, Leroy Edwards, allowing him to score a mere 6 points (the lowest output of his career). The New York Post reacted with alarm: "The score says that NYU is the best college basketball team in the country and that the East still is supreme. But if Frank Lane, the ref from the Midwest, had worked the game, it's safe to assume big Leroy Edwards would have been given a fantastic number of foul shots. Minor mayhem was committed on the person of Edwards by Terjesen and Klein. Something will have to be done or the game will become entirely too rough."[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Rule 5 (Violations), Article 26. "Official Basketball Rules 2006" (pdf).  
  2. ^ New York Post, quoted in Laudeman, Tev (1972). The Rupp Years: The University of Kentucky's Golden Era of Basketball. Louisville: Louisville Courier-Journal.  
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