World Library  

Succession of seats

Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

United States District Court for the District of Utah

 

United States District Court for the District of Utah

Center for Democracy
& Technology
CDT logo
Founded December 1994
Founder Jerry Berman, Janlori Goldman, Deirdre Mulligan, Jonah Seiger, Daniel Weitzner
Type Non-profit organization
Location
Locations
Key people President & Chief Executive Officer Nuala O'Connor
Website cdt.org

Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) is a

1 Marshall, John AugustineJohn Augustine Marshall UT 1854–1941 1896–1915 Cleveland,Cleveland resignation
2 Johnson, Tillman DavisTillman Davis Johnson UT 1858–1953 1915[30]–1949 1949–1953 Wilson,Wilson death
3 Ritter, Willis WilliamWillis William Ritter UT 1899–1978 1949[31]–1978 1954–1978 Truman,Truman death
4 Christensen, Albert ShermanAlbert Sherman Christensen UT 1905–1996 1954–1971 1971–1996 Eisenhower,Eisenhower death
5 Anderson, Aldon JuniorAldon Junior Anderson UT 1917–1996 1971–1984 1978–1984 1984–1996 Nixon,Nixon death
7 Winder, David KeithDavid Keith Winder UT 1932–2009 1979–1997 1993–1997 1997–2009 Carter,Carter death
8 Greene, Jr., John ThomasJohn Thomas Greene, Jr. UT 1929–2011 1985–1997 1997–2011 Reagan,Reagan death
14 Cassell, Paul G.Paul G. Cassell UT 1959–present 2002–2007 Bush, G.W.G.W. Bush resignation

See also

Notes

  • ^ Helft, Miguel (March 30, 2010). "Technology Coalition Seeks Stronger Privacy Laws". The New York Times. 
  • ^ Nissenbaum, Helen (2009-11-24). Privacy in Context: Technology ...  
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ Meeks, Brock (December 20, 1994). "Changes in the Wind At EFF". Cyberwire Dispatch. 
  • ^ "S.2448: Internet Integrity and Critical Infrastructure Protection Act of 2000". 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "We Need to Know | Center for Democracy & Technology". Cdt.org. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "Four Key Reforms for NSA Surveillance | Center for Democracy & Technology". Cdt.org. 2014-03-14. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "Testimony of Leslie Harris Before the EuroParl LIBE Committee Inquiry on Electronic Mass Surveillance of EU Citizens | Center for Democracy & Technology". Cdt.org. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ Helft, Miguel (March 30, 2010). "Technology Coalition Seeks Stronger Privacy Laws". The New York Times. 
  • ^ Nissenbaum, Helen (2009-11-24). Privacy in Context: Technology ...  
  • ^ "Center for Democracy and Technology — MacArthur Foundation". Macfound.org. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "CDT Funding 2012". 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ Meeks, Brock (December 20, 1994). "Changes in the Wind At EFF". Cyberwire Dispatch. 
  • ^ "S.2448: Internet Integrity and Critical Infrastructure Protection Act of 2000". 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "We Need to Know | Center for Democracy & Technology". Cdt.org. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "CDT Timeline". Highlights.cdt.info. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "Four Key Reforms for NSA Surveillance | Center for Democracy & Technology". Cdt.org. 2014-03-14. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "Testimony of Leslie Harris Before the EuroParl LIBE Committee Inquiry on Electronic Mass Surveillance of EU Citizens | Center for Democracy & Technology". Cdt.org. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  • ^ "Office of the United States Attorneys". Executive Office for United States Attorneys. United States Department of Justice. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  • ^ Senate confirms new judge for Utah, Deseret News, 9/27/2008
  • ^ "Biographical Directory of Federal Judges". 
  • ^ Recess appointment; formally nominated on January 7, 1916, confirmed by the United States Senate on January 18, 1916, and received commission on January 18, 1916.
  • ^ Recess appointment; formally nominated on January 5, 1950, confirmed by the United States Senate on June 29, 1950, and received commission on July 7, 1950.
  • External links

    • United States District Court for the District of Utah Official Website
    • District of Utah Federal Court Practice blog

    See also

    In 1994, CDT was founded by [16]

    History and approach

    As an organization with expertise in law, technology, and policy, CDT works to preserve the unique nature of the Internet, enhance freedom of expression globally, protect fundamental rights of privacy, and stronger legal controls on government surveillance by finding practical and innovative solutions to public policy challenges while protecting civil liberties. CDT is dedicated to building consensus among all parties interested in the future of the Internet and other new communications media.[14] In addition to its D.C. office, CDT has an office in San Francisco and a full-time presence in Brussels.

    [13] (CDT) is a Center for Democracy & Technology

    Center for Democracy
    & Technology
    CDT logo
    Founded December 1994
    Founder Jerry Berman, Janlori Goldman, Deirdre Mulligan, Jonah Seiger, Daniel Weitzner
    Type Non-profit organization
    Location
    Locations
    Key people President & Chief Executive Officer Nuala O'Connor
    Website cdt.org
    In 2001, CDT launched its Standards Project with the aim of educating and engaging

    Internet architecture

    CDT has a full-time presence in Brussels, engaging issues such as the General Data Protection Regulation, the EU intellectual property enforcement directive, the European Commission's cybersecurity strategy, and the EU net neutrality policy. CDT was the first civil society group to testify to the inquiry set up by the European Parliament's Civil Liberties Committee in the wake of the Edward Snowden revelations. CDT staff also testified before the European Parliament LIBE Committee Inquiry regarding the electronic mass surveillance of EU citizens.[12]

    European Union

    CDT launched Global Internet Policy Initiative in 2000, partnering with Internews to survey 11 developing countries to assess their telecom and Internet policies. CDT staff have worked with Frank LaRue to shape report on Internet human right and the U.S. Ambassador to the UN Human Rights Council to educate members of the Council on Internet freedom in advance of the successful Resolution on Internet Freedom. CDT also presented a paper at the 2013 Internet Governance Forum on Internet neutrality's role in promoting the exercise of free expression and human rights online.

    Global internet policy and human rights

    [11][10] In the early 90s, the

    Security, surveillance, and the NSA

    The Communications Decency Act (CDA) of 1996 was the first law to attempt to limit free expression on the Internet in the name of child safety. In response, CDT founded the Citizens Internet Empowerment Coalition (CIEC) that brought together technology companies with publishers, librarians, and free speech groups to work to protect free speech. CIEC argued that empowering users to control access to content themselves, rather than government censorship, was the right way to protect both children and free speech online [7] CDT's campaign to strike down the CDA included the first-ever Internet blackout, with more than 5,000 websites going black to protest the law, and the first real-time announcement of a Supreme Court decision online.[8] In 2005, CDT led grassroots efforts to stop FEC proposed campaign finance rules for the Internet, bringing together a coalition of bloggers and online activists across the political spectrum and collaborating with the Institute for Politics, Democracy & the Internet.

    Free expression

    In 2010, CDT launched the Digital Due Process Coalition, established around four principles for Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) reform. Currently, the coalition has over one hundred members including some of the biggest Internet companies to advocacy groups across the entire political spectrum. The campaign for ECPA reform has brought the need for extending full constitutional protections to the Internet to the forefront of the national debate and has resulted in 2013 coalition-supported bipartisan bills in both houses of Congress.[6]

    CDT has also voiced privacy concerns over the practice of “deep packet inspection” (DPI), which allows companies to ask Internet Service Providers for data, collecting and categorizing individual Internet traffic streams to service ads based on that information without express user consent. CDT conducted legal analysis to show how DPI advertising practices could violate the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and testified before Congress. In 2009, major ISPs affirmed that they would not use DPI-based behavioral advertising without very robust opt-in provisions. In the same year, CDT launched the Health Privacy Project to bring expertise to complex privacy issues surrounding technology use in health care. A year later, CDT recommended new guidelines for reporting data breaches and for protecting health data used in marketing. These guidelines were incorporated into the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

    Following an influx of spyware in 2003, CDT filed complaints against egregious actors with the FTC, resulting in historic settlements against spyware companies. CDT pulled together the largest anti-spyware and anti-virus companies, leading security product distributors, and public interest groups to create the Anti-Spyware Coalition (ASC). The ASC developed a self-regulatory model for companies based on shared definitions of spyware, a comprehensive risk model, best practices for software companies, and a concise vendor conflict resolution process. Using the ASC outputs, anti-spyware companies could label malicious software and protect consumers without fear of being sued by the companies they were targeting, and advertisers could keep better track of where their advertisements were displayed.

    CDT helped craft the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act in 1998. Testifying before Congress, CDT argued that the FTC should be able to develop rules to protect both adults' and children's privacy online. Forming a coalition of free expression and youth rights groups, CDT and its coalition secured an amendment to limit parental consent to children 12 and under, allowing teenagers to enjoy more freedom online.

    Consumer privacy

    Projects and initiatives

    CDT utilizes an expertise-based advocacy model and acts as a non-partisan convener to bring all parties with a stake in the Internet to the table. CDT advises government officials, agencies, corporations, and civil society on the policy action that will maintain the open and free nature of the Internet. CDT often works with legislators on controversial legislation. For example, CDT offered opinions on the rework of the Internet Integrity and Critical Infrastructure Protection Act of 2000 (S.2448),[5] a computer-crime bill introduced in the 106th Congress by Senators Orrin Hatch, Patrick Leahy, and Chuck Schumer.

    In 1994, CDT was founded by Jerry Berman, the former executive director and former policy director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. The battle against applying the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) to the Internet - expanding law enforcement wiretapping capabilities by requiring telephone companies to design their networks to ensure a certain basic level of government access - spurred the creation of CDT in 1994.[3] Recognizing a threat to privacy and innovation in CALEA's design mandates, CDT fought the passage of the CALEA and later worked to ensure that its implementation would not extend to the Internet. In the end, CALEA did not contain wiretapping design mandates for the Internet and required transparency surrounding design standards. Today, CDT leads a strong coalition that fights CALEA expansion, issuing reports by leading security experts that demonstrate how the FBI's latest wiretapping proposal would undermine cybersecurity. CDT's launch was assisted by seed donations from AT&T Corporation, Bell Atlantic, Nynex, Apple, and Microsoft.[4]

    History and approach

    Contents

    • History and approach 1
    • Projects and initiatives 2
      • Consumer privacy 2.1
      • Free expression 2.2
      • Security, surveillance, and the NSA 2.3
      • Global internet policy and human rights 2.4
      • European Union 2.5
      • Internet architecture 2.6
    • History and approach 3
    • Support 4
    • See also 5
    • Projects and initiatives 6
      • Consumer privacy 6.1
      • Free expression 6.2
      • Security, surveillance, and the NSA 6.3
      • Global internet policy and human rights 6.4
      • European Union 6.5
      • Internet architecture 6.6
    • Current judges 7
    • Vacancies and pending nominations 8
    • Former Judges 9
    • Succession of seats 10
    • See also 11
    • Notes 12
    • External links 13

    As an organization with expertise in law, technology, and policy, CDT works to preserve the unique nature of the Internet, enhance freedom of expression globally, protect fundamental rights of privacy, and stronger legal controls on government surveillance by finding practical and innovative solutions to public policy challenges while protecting civil liberties. CDT is dedicated to building consensus among all parties interested in the future of the Internet and other new communications media.[2] In addition to its D.C. office, CDT has an office in San Francisco and a full-time presence in Brussels.

    [1]

    This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
     
    Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
     
    By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
     



    Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Fair are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
    a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.