Zulu social aid and pleasure club

The Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club (founded 1916) is a Carnival Krewe in New Orleans, Louisiana which puts on the Zulu parade each Mardi Gras Day. Zulu is New Orleans' largest predominantly African American carnival organization known for its blackfaced krewe members wearing grass skirts and its unique throw of hand-painted coconuts.

History

In 1908, John L. Metoyer and members of a New Orleans Mutual aid society called “The Tramps”, attended a vaudevillian comedy show called, “There Never Was and Never Will Be a King Like Me”. The musical comedy performed by the “Smart Set” at the Pythian Temple Theater on the corner of Gravier and Saratoga in New Orleans, included a skit where the characters wore grass skirts and dressed in blackface. Metoyer became inspired by the skit and reorganized his marching troupe from baggy-pant-wearing tramps to a new group called the “Zulus”. In 1909, Metoyer and the first Zulu king, William Story, wore a lard-can crown and carried a banana stalk as a scepter. Six years later in 1915, the first decorated platform was constructed with dry goods boxes on a spring wagon. The King’s float was decorated with tree moss and palmetto leaves.

In 1916, Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club became incorporated where the organization’s bylaws were established as well as its social mission and dedication to benevolence and goodwill.
In 1933, the Lady Zulu Auxiliary was formed by the wives of Zulu members, and in 1948, Edwina Robertson became the first Queen of Zulu making the club the first to feature a queen in a parade.
In the 1960s, membership dwindled as a result of social pressures from civil rights activists. The protesters advertised in the local black community's newspaper The Louisiana Weekly stating:[1] Template:Cquote The krewe, with support of the Mayor and Chief-of-Police, refused to fall from pressures and continued to parade, but gave up blackfacing, wearing grass skirts, and kept the identity of the king secret. Due to continued pressures, by 1965, there were only 15 Zulu members remaining. The membership of local civil rights leaders Ernest J. Wright and Morris F.X. Jeff, Sr. into Zulu, eventually lifted tensions and membership started to increase and the krewe resumed their old traditions including blackface.

In 1973, Roy E."Glap” Glapion, Jr., Zulu president from 1973–1988, started recruiting professionals, educators, and prominent businessmen from all ethnic backgrounds to fill its membership - making Zulu the first parading organization to racially integrate.

Zulu Coconut

Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club is well known to parade goers for throwing coconuts, called the 'Golden Nugget', to the crowd.[2] In the early 1900s, other parading organizations threw fancy glass necklaces that were handmade and expensive. The working men of Zulu could not afford expensive treats, but still wanted to give a special prize to lucky parade goers. The men decided to purchase coconuts from the French Market because they were unique and inexpensive. Painted and adorned coconuts became popular with the club starting in the late 1940s. In 1987, the organization was unable to renew its insurance coverage. Mounting lawsuits stemming from coconut related injuries, forced a halt to the longstanding tradition of throwing coconuts. In 1988, Governor Edwin W. Edwards signed Louisiana State Bill #SB188, the “Coconut Bill”, into law removing liability from injuries resulting from a coconut - enabling the tradition to resume.

King of Zulu

List of Past Kings of Zulu[3]

  • 1909 – William Story
  • 1910 – William J. Crawford
  • 1911 – Alex Washington
  • 1912 – Peter Williams
  • 1913 – James Bolton
  • 1914 – Henry Harris
  • 1915 – John White
  • 1916 – John White
  • 1917 – James Robertson
  • 1918-1919 – WAR
  • 1920 – Freddie Brown
  • 1921 – James Robertson
  • 1922 – Herbert Permillion
  • 1923 – Joseph Kahoe
  • 1924 – Adrian Hippolite
  • 1925 – Baley Robertson
  • 1926 – Joseph L. Smith
  • 1927 – Arnold L. Moss
  • 1928 – Henry Hicks
  • 1929 – Wurry Watson
  • 1930 – Paul Johnson
  • 1931 – Allen Leon
  • 1932 – Alonzo Butler
  • 1933 – Allen Leon
  • 1934 – Leopold LeBlanc
  • 1935 – Baptiste Giles
  • 1936 – Edward Hewlett
  • 1937 – Arthur Royal
  • 1938 – Leopold LeBlanc
  • 1939 – Allen James
  • 1940 – Emmanuel Bernard
  • 1941 – Alonzo Butler
  • 1942-1945 – WAR
  • 1946 – Clen Vandage
  • 1947 – Joseph Warrington
  • 1948 – James Smith
  • 1949 – Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong
  • 1950 – William Poole
  • 1951 – Roland Brown
  • 1959 – Melvin Green
  • 1960 – Baptiste Giles
  • 1961 – Henry Johnson
  • 1962 – Melvin Green
  • 1963 – William Poole
  • 1964 – Edward Johnson
  • 1965 – Milton Bienamee
  • 1966 – Alfred “Al” Barnes
  • 1967 – Milton Bienamee
  • 1968 – William “Honey” Boykins
  • 1969 – Elizah J. Peters
  • 1970 – Milton Bienamee
  • 1971 – Henry “Bo” Berry
  • 1972 – Arthur “Sonny Boy” Carter
  • 1973 – Steve “Bulldog Buddy” Johnson
  • 1974 - Morris FX Jeff
  • 1975 – Harold Doley
  • 1976 – Dr. Lawler P. Daniels Jr.
  • 1977 – A.J. “Chuck” Mercadel
  • 1978 – Willie L. Papin
  • 1979 – Joseph O. Misshore, Jr.
  • 1980 – Elliot Boisdore
  • 1981 – John Elliot Adams
  • 1982 – Charles L. Givens
  • 1983 – Jesse J. Balancier
  • 1984 – Alfred H. Gordon
  • 1985 – Eddie R. Carter
  • 1986 – Louis Augustin
  • 1987 – Fred Thomas
  • 1988 – Arthur Vigne
  • 1989 – Owens “OJ” Haynes
  • 1990 – Keith E. Weatherspoon
  • 1991 – Charles E. Hamilton, Jr.
  • 1992 – James “Jim” Russell
  • 1993 – Oscar Piper
  • 1994 – David Belfield
  • 1995 – Straughter Prophet
  • 1996 – Louis R. Rainey, Jr.
  • 1998 – Wallace Broussard
  • 1999 – Dr. Myron Moorehead
  • 2000 – Roy E. Glapion, Jr.
  • 2001 – Melvin A. Armour
  • 2002 – Louis “Tony” Williams
  • 2003 – Gary A. Thornton
  • 2004 – Gerard M. Johnson
  • 2005 – Isaac “Ike” Wheeler
  • 2006 – No Elections Due to Hurricane Katrina
  • 2007 – Larry A. Hammond
  • 2008 – Frank Boutte’
  • 2009 – Tyrone Anthony Mathieu, Sr.
  • 2010 – Jimmie L. Felder
  • 2011 – Anthony "Tony" Barker, Sr.
  • 2012 - Elroy Anthony James[4]
  • 2013 - Cedric George Givens[5]

See also

Carnival
New Orleans Mardi Gras

References


Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club
732 N Broad St
New Orleans, LA 70119
(504) 827-9551
N. Broad St. and Orleans Ave.
29°58′15.53″N 90°4′56.27″W / 29.9709806°N 90.0822972°W / 29.9709806; -90.0822972Coordinates: 29°58′15.53″N 90°4′56.27″W / 29.9709806°N 90.0822972°W / 29.9709806; -90.0822972

External links

  • Zulu Official Page

ja:レックス・パレード

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